Archive for the ‘WW2’ Category

The stretcher bearers are from Black Tree Designs, otherwise known

as EOS Orbis Black Tree Design.

These guys are for my Commonwealth Crete force and are made of metal.



A word of warning. The figures are quiet nice but the company is

completely useless. Don’t just take my word for search around on the

internet and read the tales of disappointment. I gave up waiting for my figures

to arrive after numerous emails and phone calls which never get answered. Luckily

Paypal came to the rescue and got me my money back and eventually I bought the figures

off fleabay from a private seller.

These are the Cretan Police force on Crete in WWII. They fought for the resistance and

the Germans depending on local and personal loyalties. This bunch are on the allied side

and are a conversion of Gripping Beast Ottoman Turks with French kepi heads.

Armed with basic rifles and looted German kit.

If your an avid wargamer and you like building terrain, then this

is the book for you. I bought Volume 1(Winter Wargaming) about two years ago and loved the

book so this latest book(Volume 2 Mediterranean Wargaming) was a must buy and Im not disappointed.

The book is a detailed guide to the work of Pat Smith and all the work he has completed over

the years. To cut a long story short a number of years ago Pat decided to collate all his

fantastic work on the wargamingwithsilverwhistle.blogspot.com and put it into a book. Volume 1

was so successful he decided to do another and thus my blog post.

Ok, so what exactly do get for your £20 of money ? You get a 148 page book of glossy pictures

to drool over and in depth step by step guides to building and painting terrain. There is also

information on painting figures and vehicles.

The exact contents includes the chapters:

  •  Introduction.
  •  Materials.
  •  Terrain mat and flexible roads.
  •  Mountain terrain.
  •  Bridges.
  •  Buildings.
  •  Damaged and destroyed buildings.
  •  Olive groves.
  •  Terraced hills,pillbox and blockhouse.
  •  Vineyards.
  •  Orchards and cypress trees.
  •  Terrain clutter.
  •  Figure painting.
  •  Vehicles.
  •  Guest painter- Moiterei talks Italian.
  •  The scene is set.
  •  Links.

What really sells this book is the straight forward descriptions and methods

of how the terrain is created and with such everyday tools. Nothing in this book

is unachievable to the average model maker/wargamer and is a true inspiration to

just start building and gluing.

I cannot wait for the next volume, well done.

If your interested in buying the book, just click on the .link..
 

The rifle section was the core building block of the British army organization of WW2 and was the chief instrument in Normandy in closing with the enemy and destroying him.
In 1944 the British rifle section consisted of ten men. The section was commanded by a Corporal who would normally divide his team into six riflemen, which he led and a bren gun team of two with a Lance corporal commanding (so two groups of 7 and 3 men).

The standard infantry man was equipped with a Lee Enfield number 4 .303 rifle and could fire at targets up to 550yds away. This bolt action rifle was reliable and accurate.

The section leader carried a 9mm Sten gun which even though was an inaccurate and somewhat unreliable weapon was favoured for its effectiveness in close quarter battles, especially as it was able to fire 500 rounds a minute.
Each section was issued one Bren gun and the two-man team that operated it was known as the “gun group”. The team consisted of a No1 who carried and operated the Bren and a No 2 who loaded and spotted targets. The No2 also carried spare ammunition and barrels. Additional ammunition for the Bren was also carried my all members of the rifle section. The Bren usefully also fired 303 rounds and had an effective range of 600 yards. It fired 500 rounds a minute

Individual riflemen were also equipped with grenades, the No 36 grenade and White Phosphorous grenade (Phosphorous grenades were used to produce smoke).

In combat the section centred on the Bren gun with its considerable flexibility and reliability. As the 1937 training manual,” Application of Fire” stated the lmg was main fire producing weapon and led to tactics revolving around this weapon.

In attack the British section would split into two. The Bren gun team of 3 men would move to the flank and provide suppressing fire on the target while the other group of riflemen(team of 7) would close with the enemy. Ideally the Bren gun would get to 90 degrees of the target allowing a cross fire between the two groups.
The rifle team would close with the enemy using grenades and bayonets to finish the job off.

In an attempt to get started on my Bolt Action terrain

boards I am getting stuck into the fine detail. I wanted

something extra and typical in a Normandy farm yard,

thus the cider press.

Normandy is covered in apple orchards and is famous

for its drinks made from apple juice. These include,

Cidre(Cider) apple wine fermented from apple juice,

Calvados(apple brandy) distilled dry fermented cider

which is then aged in oak barrels, Pommeau(aperitif)

unfermented apple juice and apple brandy aged in oak

barrels and finally Benedictine(herbal liquer) a mixture

of plants and spices distilled in oak barrels.

All these were made on an industrial scale and more

importantly a very local scale. If you had century old

apple or even pear orchards on your land then all

you had to do was build a rustic apple press from

spare timber and let the happy times begin.

My simple press is meant to look as rustic as

possible and simply works by dropping apples

into the wooden barrel usually within a muslin

or cloth wrap. The long pole will be attached to

the top and would have been turned forcing a simple

wooden block board down squashing the apples. The

pomace(juice) runs out via a funnel/pipe at the bottom.

Obviously at the moment its not complete and requires

some legs and painting. If your wondering what the silver

bands  are around  the barrel,they are artist foil.

I will post up the finished product soon perhaps with a

scratch built apple run as well.

Oh I have also been making some Cidre bill boards to

advertise on the road side.

Below is a typical Normandy cidre press found

on every farm.

trophy

The rules in a nutshell:

Look at the pictures below which contain 6, 15mm Tiger tanks from

Schwer SS Panzer Abt 101 driving down a Normandy road in 1944, made

by various manufactures. The Tigers have been painted, some are

slightly converted and camouflage has been added. So all 6 Tigers

are battle board ready.

Your job is to identify which tank belongs to which manufacturer,
simple ?

All you have to do is post your guess to be entered into the competition. You
must identify the maker of tanks. Each tank has a 3 figure number on the turret
and below it to identify it. You must match the tank number to one of the six
manufacturers listed below.

  1. Zvezda.
  2. Battlefront.
  3. Forged In Battle.
  4. Peter Pig.
  5. Skytrex.
  6. Plastic Soldier Company.

The competition will stay open until the end of June and the winner will be judged by me. In
the case of a draw the names will be put into a hat and a winner drawn out. Only one guess
per person is allowed.

The winner will receive a Battlefront 15mm Tiger Tank.

The pictures:

Click on any picture to enlarge:

Comp1

Comp2

Comp3

Comp4

Comp5

Comp6

Comp7

Good luck everybody.

ModelDads-Miniature-Gaming-and-Modelling-Top
ModelDads-Miniature-Gaming-and-Modelling-Main

You might of noticed that my previous post called,

More completed Loic Neveu 15mm terrain” had a hint

of something more to come ? Well about 3 months ago

I noticed that I had been using a large amount of useful

information(tutorials and painting guides) from a few select

blogs and websites. One particular site I am very fond of is

Modeldads and as a way of saying thank you for all the

excellent posts on that site I decided to give something back

in the way of a painting tutorial for the Loic Neveu 15mm building

pictured below.

.Ruin3

So happy Christmas modeldads and thank you Justin for allowing

me to contribute to your fantastic site.

Please check out the tutorial and the other great posts

on modeldads.

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As promised a closer look at the other end of

the village which is still in progress especially the

water course.

The 1st picture is of the Loic Neveu Manor house and I

was considering changing the picture to black and white

to make it more brooding but the swastika, the colour of

the building and the sunlight makes it creepy enough.

Just click on a picture to enlarge.

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Warning, lots of large pictures. Just click on

a picture to enlarge.

Just wanted to show you how I have been getting

on with my continuing Normandy boards. Still a long way

to go but all 3 boards are coming along nicely. As you

can see from the pictures the 3 additional boards

allow me to crawl out of the Normandy bocage and right

into the local village for a bit of street fighting.

The name of the church and village are fictional so

don’t bother looking for it lol

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The buildings are all mixed manufacturers and the centre

piece church is a Loic Neveu masterpiece. If you really

need to know who makes any particular building just contact

me for the details.

)Normvil3

As mentioned in previous posts I have been using Google Maps

to get inspiration and ideas from,especially the church. Most

French villages have a church surrounded by a circular wall and

often sit right in the middle of the village with a road curving

around the church. There is often a war memorial right next to

the church as well.

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A few bits of info on the church. The gates to L`eglise Saint Andre

are scratch built and the stained glass windows are a combination of

free hand painting and see through plastic. The roof is removable

so you can fill the church with soldiers to your hearts content.

All buildings on the boards are removable except the walls which are fixed

in position. Also to help with storage the telegraph poles are fixed to the

board with magnets so easily moved.

Lots more to do especially at the more built up end of the village but

light is shining from the end of the tunnel.

If your wondering that’s a Panzer Lehr Division rolling through 🙂

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Normandy Tiger

Normandy Tiger

Normandy Tiger

I have not painted up any German armour for a long while
so on finding a Battlefront Tiger 1 E early still in my
large box of things I have never got round to painting it was game on.
Now the initial impetus came from finally watching the film, “Fury” and
no need to go into the failings of that film. Linked to a recent trip to
Bovington Tank Museum and a new burst of activity on my Normandy terrain
boards it was full steam ahead. Those of you who know your Battlefront
kits will immediately realise I had a problem because the Tiger has rubber
road wheels, no spare tracks and most importantly no zimmerit on it. All
these things are kind of vital for a Normandy Tiger. My first issue was solved
by a few rubber wheeled Tigers still serving in Normandy specifically I went for
tank number 131 belonging to Ustuf Walter Hahn of the Schwer Abteilung 101 .
Next problem was the Zimmerit, so time to experiment with fine household filler
and a sharp knife. In the end is was rather tricky but worked.

NormTig5

The model was airbrushed using Vallejo colours and it took me quite a few coats
to get the effect and colour I wanted. Unfortunately I`m no expert with an airbrush
and I`m sure a lot of people would have completed the job a lot quicker than me.
The spare tank tracks attached to the turret are PSC extras and so is part of the
stowage. The helmets are spare from somewhere ?

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Next up being Normandy and the sky being full of Allied planes just itching to bomb
something friendly or not ,some serious camouflage was called for. I have found it
really difficult to get camouflage correct on tanks as 9 times out of ten it just looks
crap. So in my best effort yet I went for the car filter scheme, which has been broken
up into tiny bits and sprayed green and brown . Scatter was then added for effect.
Decals were a problem as I was unable to find any tank numbers in 15mm that are
green with a white outline(colour of the SS 101). I partially solved the issue by
attaching clear decals with white outlines. The green of the tank comes through
the decal, its not perfect but way easier than attempting free hand.

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Hope you like it and the scenic backdrops ?